EventsMILAN

JING SHEN. THE ACT OF PAINTING IN CONTEMPORARY CHINA – PAC – MILAN

JING SHEN. THE ACT OF PAINTING IN CONTEMPORARY CHINA
A cura di: comitato scientifico PAC
Date: 10 luglio 2015 – 6 settembre 2015
Sede: PAC Padiglione d’Arte Contemporanea – Milano, Via Palestro 14
Main partner: Istituto Confucio dell’Università degli Studi di Milano
In partnership con: Feltrinelli
Info mostra: T +39 0288446359 – www.pacmilano.it
Social: facebook.com/pacmilano – instagram.com/pacmilano – vimeo.com/pacmilano – twitter.com/pacmilano – Hashtag ufficiale #jingshen

Text by by DAVIDE QUADRIO and MASSIMO TORRIGIANI – Curators

The change of a single tone in the pronunciation of jing shen 精神 enriches the title and the meaning of the exhibition with nuances and gives evidence of the fluidity and amount of details of the Chinese language. A language that contains a great number of phrases that sound the same, yet have different meanings. A language that recognises its words by using different intonations, with which the restricted number of syllables – approximately 400 – forming the language itself is pronounced. Thus, jing shen means ‘inner strength’, but also ‘awareness of the gesture’. The pictograms are identical; the shift in the meaning depends – as well as on the tone – on the context in which words are pronounced. The comprehension occurs when that degree of awareness is produced, whereby the intention of the speaker is linked to the attention of the listener, to the meaning and sensitivity of words.

In the ancient times, many of the characters used for divination were ritually linked to a verb. The image (character) contained an action in itself: its meaning was an active voice. In this sense, in the framework of the exhibition, the possible shifts in the meaning of jing shen work as an allegory: they define the meeting point between an artist and his work. They identify the act – the awareness – that comes before the gesture. The moment that motivates the Buddhist monk to wait for a lifetime before the ‘perfect brush stroke’ 真空妙有. Neither a means, nor a form of relationship with the recipient of the work.

The argument according to which the gesture, both traditionally and in its current developments, is what makes Chinese painting and art culturally distinctive arises from a critical perspective originally developed by the writer together with Defne Ayas – who is also a member of the PAC Curatorial Board1 – through an exploration of the relationship between ink painting, calligraphy and contemporary art, in its less traditional instances. A research that, in 2011 and 2012, tangibly translated into Now Ink, a two-part exhibition; both parts were implemented in the framework of Shanghai contemporary art fair and over thirty artists attended. The project aimed at highlighting the ways in which ink and calligraphy – the rhythm and approach they need or suggest – resurface in the work of contemporary artists, especially but not only in China and Asia. Underlining the need to re-think the definition for ‘contemporary’ – and ‘international’ – in the Chinese culture. Also dealing with the issue of breakups and reconciliations between the present and the past. And crossing the boundaries of too often sociological or political interpretations of contemporary art in China.

It should be pointed out that our perspective has not merely arisen from the acknowledgement of some superficial signs of return of ink painting or calligraphy – which have always been present in their most traditional, though updated, forms. More than anything, we based our views on the identification of a widespread trend among the artists of the last generation, who tend towards a different working pace, towards an extreme precision of details, towards careful curlicues. It seemed to us that these trends implied something extremely new and extremely hereditary at the same time. Working times and methods different from those featured by the artists of the previous generation. By the protagonists of the first wave of what is recognised as ‘Chinese contemporary art’. A generation that has defined its independence also by adopting anti-academic and anti-traditional positions, as well as through the first video experiments, with sounds and installations. And also through alternative production methods, the choice of unconventional exhibition venues and innovative set-up devices.
The questions that the project Now Ink and its two exhibitions brought forward are still meaningful, but drawing the attention to ink – a technical medium, though rich and complex – has proved itself to be misleading. The main risk was contributing to emphasise the trend – or temptation – that is typical of the Western dominating culture, i.e. reducing other cultures to their exotic version. With retro and folk nuances that catch the attention by simplifying and marginalising – rather than focussing on and giving complexity back to – themes and formats that would provide a more in-depth understanding of those cultures.

On the contrary, a reflection on the gesture implies a constellation of meaning that better defines the specificity of Chinese art. Thus, Jing Shen. The Act of Painting in Contemporary China deals – from an innovative point of view – with the emergence of themes and methods that are typical of classical Chinese art in the work of twenty artists from three different generations. From Li Huasheng, born in 1944, to He Xiangyu, born in 1986.

We have always been very aware, in making our considerations and choices, of the immeasurable differences between Chinese culture and our culture as to the concepts of original and copy, of past and present. A cultural system in which two ideas – such as those of originality and legacy – are so deeply different from ours, represents a perpetual challenge to the practices of ‘translation’ and ‘contextualisation’.
As well as to any attempt to canonise an aesthetics or a story in particular. It reminds us that what we see through the lenses of our culture is the product of constructions, preconceptions and prejudices; just like any other view.

In the Chinese culture, painting holds an exceptional position. One need look no further than the fact that, in China, writing is painting.
And vice versa. For artists, critics, curators, collectors and the audience, painting is and has always been a privileged device to think about and understand the world and art. It is a means that still gives rise – with well-thought awareness – to broadly and deeply meaningful reflections and outcomes. Its influence is so pervasive that it surfaces and makes itself visible not only on canvas or paper, but also in installations, performances, sculptures, videos and digital works. Therefore, Jing Shen. The Act of Painting in Contemporary China is not – or not only – an exhibition of paintings, but rather an exhibition on the relationship of painting with other media; on its fundamental role within any cultural universe.

Writing is an extremely technical art form, led by the gestural skills of the artists that perform it. Writing is not only about drawing physical characters. The gesture makes the characters important, but brings ambiguities and contradictions along. In order to draw a vertical stroke, not only you have to be able to create a perfect line, from the top to the bottom, but also to complete the movement with a reverse gesture that finishes off the brush stroke. In the connection between the gesture and the mind, the representation of the image (the character, the pictogram) is finally achieved. Every codified gesture needs to be knowingly created, but still maintains its original essence; characters and gestures are both structured, yet free. Finite, yet open to evolutions. Similarly, the act of painting – or of making art, regardless of the medium – in China is deeply related to aware action. A search for balance that calls for both order and fluidity.

We believe that the curators’ view on the exhibition – the originality of its tone – entails going beyond the interpretation according to which Chinese contemporary art is a reflection of its Western counterparty – and origin. Jing Shen argues that classical Chinese art – not only painting, but also ceramics and woodblock printing, for instance – already contains the ingredients and nutrients of thoughts, trends and shapes that represent the treasure of contemporary Chinese art. The exchange with the West and with other worlds (let us not forget our marginality within the cultural geography of China) enriches this osmosis between the past and the present, this continuity – which is sometimes difficult – but never replaces it; if anything, it makes it hybrid.

As we said at the beginning, jing shen refers to the moment preceding the pictorial act in classical painting – also of Buddhist or Taoist tradition. It is the climax of a preliminary work that comes before facing the production of an image. An idea and a practice that emphasise a well-thought search for awareness and its active outcome: the act of painting.

A ‘proactive’, gestural painting, whose traces surface in the most diverse ways in the selection of works and artists on display at the PAC.
For instance, from the way in which pictorial works are created with the help of fate and everyday life influences (Lee Kit); to the paintings’ rejection to become static, maintaining their features as images of light and movement instead (Li Shurui); to obsessive reiteration as a supreme form of change (Ding Yi); to its becoming instinctive, mimetic and spatial (Zhang Enli). All of this is the countermelody of a Western painting that has always been more solemn and iconographical. (In this sense, the special section of this book, edited by Britta Erickson, which collects 20th-century works, aims at defining the theme of the gesture by analysing the main issues of the exhibition in
the developments of Chinese modernism and its ambiguous – and ambivalent – relationships with Western art).

The exhibition also wants to suggest to what extent art and the American and European avant-gardes of the second post-war period have been influenced by this artistic culture, by ink painting and calligraphy, and by their underlying philosophies. And it wants to think of art as a whole, as the outcome of an exchange and continuous influence over time and space, where the rules of interpretation can only be errant, adaptable and provisional.

.-.-.

testo di DAVIDE QUADRIO e MASSIMO TORRIGIANI – curatori della mostra

La variazione di un singolo tono nella pronuncia di jing shen 精神 arrichisce di risonanze titolo e senso della mostra, e testimonia le fluidità e le sottigliezze della lingua cinese. Una lingua che contiene un alto numero di espressioni che hanno lo stesso suono, ma significano cose diverse. Lingua che differenzia le parole attraverso le intonazioni con le quali viene pronunciato il numero limitato di sillabe che la compongono – circa 400. Così jing shen può voler dire “forza interiore”, ma anche “consapevolezza del gesto”. I pittogrammi sono identici; lo spostamento di significato dipende, oltre che dal tono, dal contesto nel quale le parole sono pronunciate. La comprensione avviene nel momento in cui si produce quel grado di coscienza che unisce l’intenzione di chi parla all’attenzione di chi ascolta, al senso e alla sensibilità delle parole.

Nell’antichità moltissimi dei caratteri “divinatori” erano ritualmente connessi a un verbo. L’immagine (carattere) conteneva in sé un’azione: il suo significato era una forma attiva. In questo senso, nel contesto della mostra, i possibili slittamenti di senso di jing shen funzionano come allegoria: designano il punto di incontro tra un artista e il suo lavoro. Indicano l’atto – la consapevolezza – che sta prima del gesto.
Il momento che motiva il monaco buddista ad attendere una vita prima della “pennellata perfetta” 真空妙有. Non un mezzo né una forma di relazione con il destinatario dell’opera.

L’argomento che sia il gesto, sia tradizionalmente sia nei suoi sviluppi attuali, a rendere culturalmente distintiva la pittura e l’arte cinese nasce da una prospettiva critica sviluppata inizialmente da chi scrive insieme a Defne Ayas – anche lei parte del Comitato Scientifico del PAC1 – attraverso una ricognizione sul rapporto tra pittura a inchiostro, calligrafia e arte contemporanea, nelle sue espressioni meno tradizionali. Una ricerca che nel 2011 e 2012 si è concretizzata in Now Ink, una mostra in due parti, entrambe realizzate nell’ambito della fiera d’arte contemporanea di Shanghai, con la partecipazione di più di trenta artisti. Un progetto il cui obiettivo era mettere in evidenza i modi nei quali inchiostro e calligrafia – il ritmo e l’approccio che richiedono o suggeriscono – riemergono nel lavoro di artisti contemporanei, soprattutto in Cina e in Asia, ma non solo. Sottolineando la necessità di ripensare alla definizione di “contemporaneo” – e di “internazionale” – nella cultura cinese. Affrontando anche la questione delle fratture e delle ricomposizioni tra presente e passato. E uscendo dalle cornici interpretative, troppo spesso sociologiche o politiche, dell’arte contemporanea in Cina.

Una prospettiva la nostra – va sottolineato – che non è nata solo dal riconoscimento di superficiali segnali di ritorno della pittura a inchiostro o della calligrafia, che nelle loro forme più tradizionali, sebbene attualizzate, ci sono sempre state, quanto all’individuazione di una diffusa attitudine tra gli artisti dell’ultima generazione a un diverso ritmo di lavoro, a una estrema precisione nei dettagli, a intrecci minuziosi. Atteggiamenti che ci è sembrato alludessero a qualcosa di estremamente nuovo e di estremamente ereditario insieme. Tempi e modi di lavoro diversi da quelli battuti dagli artisti della generazione precedente. Dai protagonisti della prima onda di quella che viene riconosciuta come “arte contemporanea cinese”. Una generazione che ha definito la sua autonomia anche attraverso posizioni anti-accademiche e anti-tradizionali, oltre che attraverso le prime sperimentazioni video, con suono e installazioni. E attraverso modi di produzione alternativi, la scelta di luoghi espositivi non convenzionali e inediti dispositivi di allestimento.
Gli interrogativi aperti dal progetto Now Ink e dalle sue due mostre sono ancora pregnanti, ma porre l’attenzione sull’inchiostro – un mezzo tecnico, per quanto ricco e complesso – si è dimostrato fuorviante. Il rischio principale era contribuire a enfatizzare la tendenza – o tentazione – tipica della cultura occidentale dominante di ridurre le culture altre alla loro versione esotica. Con sfumature di retro e di folk che catturano l’attenzione, semplificando e marginalizzando, più che centrando e restituendo complessità, a temi e forme che di quelle culture sosterrebbero una più profonda comprensione.

Al contrario, la riflessione sul gesto crea una costellazione di senso che definisce meglio la specificità dell’arte cinese. Jing Shen. L’atto della pittura nella Cina contemporanea affronta così – attraverso un punto di vista inedito – l’emergere di temi e modi tipici dell’arte classica cinese nel lavoro di venti artisti di tre diverse generazioni. Da Li Huasheng, nato nel 1944, a He Xiangyu, nato nel 1986.

La consapevolezza delle differenze incommensurabili tra la cultura cinese e la nostra riguardo le concezioni di originale e di copia, e di passato e di presente, è sempre stata al centro delle nostre considerazioni e delle nostre scelte. Un sistema culturale nel quale due idee come quelle di originalità e di eredità sono così radicalmente diverse dalle nostre, rappresenta una sfida continua alle pratiche di “traduzione” e di “contestualizzazione”. Oltre che a qualunque tentativo di canonizzare un’estetica o una storia in particolare. E ci ricorda che quello che vediamo attraverso le lenti della nostra cultura è un prodotto di costruzioni, preconcetti e pregiudizi; come ogni altro sguardo.

Nella cultura cinese la pittura ha una posizione eccezionale. Basti pensare che in Cina scrivere è dipingere. E viceversa. Per artisti, critici, curatori, collezionisti e pubblico, la pittura è ed è sempre stata un dispositivo privilegiato per riflettere e comprendere il mondo e l’arte. È un mezzo che produce ancora – con studiata consapevolezza – riflessioni e risultati di largo e profondo significato. Ha un’influenza tanto pervasiva da affiorare e informare di sé non solo tele o carta, ma anche installazioni, performance, scultura, video e opere digitali. Jing Shen. L’atto della pittura nella Cina contemporanea non è quindi una mostra di quadri – o non solo – ma una mostra sul rapporto che la pittura intrattiene con altri linguaggi; sulla sua essenzialità all’interno di un universo culturale.

La scrittura è una forma d’arte estremamente tecnica guidata dalla capacità gestuale degli artisti che la praticano. Scrivere non è soltanto legato al disegno di caratteri fisici. Il gesto rende importanti i caratteri, ma porta con sé ambiguità e contraddizioni. Per disegnare un tratto verticale non si deve soltanto essere in grado di creare una linea perfetta, dall’altro verso il basso, ma di concludere il movimento con un gesto inverso che completi la pennellata. È nella connessione tra gesto e mente che la rappresentazione dell’immagine (il carattere, il pittogramma) è finalmente raggiunta. Ogni gesto codificato ha bisogno di essere coscientemente creato, ma mantiene la sua essenza originaria; caratteri e gesti sono entrambi strutturati, ma liberi. Finiti, ma aperti a evoluzioni. Similmente, l’atto della pittura – o del fare arte, con qualunque mezzo – in Cina è profondamente legato all’azione cosciente. Una ricerca di equilibrio che richiede allo stesso tempo ordine e fluidità.

La prospettiva curatoriale della mostra – l’originalità del suo taglio – crediamo sia nell’andare oltre l’interpretazione che vorrebbe l’arte contemporanea cinese come riflesso della sua controparte – e origine – occidentale. Jing Shen argomenta che l’arte classica cinese – non solo la pittura, ma anche ceramica e xilografia, per esempio – contiene già gli ingredienti e i nutrienti di pensieri, attitudini e forme che costituiscono la ricchezza dell’arte cinese contemporanea. Il dialogo con l’occidente e con altri mondi (non dobbiamo dimenticare la nostra marginalità all’interno della geografia culturale cinese), arricchisce questa osmosi tra passato e presente, questa continuità – a volte problematica – ma non la sostituisce; casomai la rende ibrida.

Come detto in apertura, jing shen si riferisce al momento che nella pittura classica – anche di matrice buddista e taoista – precede l’atto pittorico. È l’apice del lavoro preparatorio che viene prima di affrontare la produzione di un’immagine. Un’idea e una pratica che mettono l’accento sulla ricerca meditata della consapevolezza e sul suo risultato attivo: l’atto della pittura.
Una pittura “attiva”, gestuale, le cui tracce affiorano nei modi più diversi nella selezione delle opere e degli artisti in mostra al PAC. Dalla maniera in cui, per esempio, le opere pittoriche si producono con il contributo del caso e del quotidiano (Lee Kit); al rifiuto dei quadri a chiudersi nella staticità, restando immagini di luce e movimento (Li Shurui); alla ripetizione ossessiva come forma suprema di cambiamento (Ding Yi); al suo rendersi istintiva, mimetica e spaziale (Zhang Enli). Tutto fa da controcanto a una pittura occidentale che è sempre stata più ieratica e iconografica. (In questo senso, la sezione speciale di questo libro curata di Britta Erickson, che raccoglie opere del XX secolo, mira a definire il tema del gesto, radicando le questioni centrali della mostra negli sviluppi del modernismo cinese e delle sue ambigue – e ambivalenti – relazioni con l’arte occidentale).

La mostra vuole anche suggerire quanto l’arte e le avanguardie americane ed europee del Secondo dopoguerra siano state influenzate da questa cultura artistica, dalla pittura a inchiostro e dalla calligrafia, e dalle filosofie a queste sottese. E vuole pensare all’arte nel suo insieme come al risultato di uno scambio e di influenze continue attraverso il tempo e lo spazio, dove i canoni interpretativi non possono che essere erranti, adattabili e temporanei.

La startup innovativa Bepart ha creato appositamente per il Padiglione d’Arte Contemporanea l’app “Jing Shen” che consentirà di visualizzare in due punti strategici di Milano – PAC e Castello Sforzesco – alcune delle opere di Jing Shen, l’atto della pittura nella Cina contemporanea che si configura così come la prima mostra con opere in realtà aumentata diffuse negli spazi urbani.

Facilissima la modalità di utilizzo: scaricando l’app “Jing Shen” – disponibile per Android e iOS a partire dal 9 luglio – e puntando lo smartphone o il tablet sulle due location selezionate è possibile visualizzare, fotografare e condividere l’installazione di Li Shurui e quattro video di Wang Gongxin, due dei venti artisti esposti.

L’applicazione guida l’utente nell’esplorazione delle cinque installazioni virtuali e consente di vedere sullo schermo del proprio smart device la sfera di Li Shurui stagliarsi nel cielo milanese o scorgere i personaggi dei video di Wang Gongxin passeggiare sulle facciate dei palazzi cittadini.

Un’operazione che abbatte le barriere fisiche museali estendendo lo spazio espositivo alla città e trasformando le modalità di fruizione dell’arte nelle aree urbane.

Photogallery – Position the cursor on the images to view captions, click on images to enlarge them.
Posizionare il cursore sulle immagini per leggere le didascalie; cliccare sulle immagini per ingrandirle.

Grazie alla collaborazione con la startup innovativa Bepart – the Public Imagination Movement – Jing Shen sarà inoltre la prima mostra ad essere diffusa in diversi punti della città attraverso la realtà aumentata.
Insieme all’Istituto Confucio dell’Università Degli Studi di Milano, main partner del progetto, il PAC svilupperà una serie di attività per introdurre adulti e famiglie alla cultura e all’arte cinesi: dai laboratori di calligrafia a quelli sull’arte del ritaglio della carta, dagli appuntamenti mattutini con il taijiquan a quelli con la ritualità della preparazione del cibo.
Nella cultura cinese la pittura ha una posizione eccezionale. Basti pensare che in Cina scrivere è dipingere. E viceversa. Per artisti, critici, curatori, collezionisti e pubblico, la pittura è ed è sempre stata un dispositivo privilegiato per riflettere e comprendere il mondo e l’arte. È un mezzo che produce ancora – con studiata consapevolezza –
riflessioni e risultati di largo e profondo significato. Ha un’influenza tanto pervasiva da affiorare e informare di sé non solo tele o carta, ma anche installazioni, performances, scultura, video e opere digitali. Jing Shen – L’atto della pittura nella Cina contemporanea non è quindi una mostra di quadri – o non solo – ma una mostra sul rapporto che la pittura intrattiene con altri linguaggi; sulla sua essenzialità all’interno di un universo culturale.
La prospettiva curatoriale della mostra – l’originalità del suo taglio – sta nell’andare oltre l’interpretazione che vorrebbe l’arte contemporanea cinese come riflesso della sua controparte – e origine – occidentale. Jing Shen argomenta che l’arte classica cinese – non solo la pittura, ma anche ceramica e xilografia, per esempio – contiene già gli ingredienti e i nutrienti di pensieri, attitudini e forme che costituiscono la ricchezza dell’arte cinese contemporanea.
Il dialogo con l’occidente e con altri mondi (non dobbiamo dimenticare la nostra marginalità all’interno della geografia culturale cinese), arricchisce questa osmosi tra passato e presente, questa continuità – a volte problematica – ma non la sostituisce.
”Jing Shen” vuol dire ”consapevolezza del gesto”, ma anche ”forza interiore”. Si riferisce al momento che nella pittura classica – anche di matrice buddista e taoista – precede l’atto pittorico. È l’apice del lavoro preparatorio che viene prima di affrontare la produzione di un’immagine. Un’idea e una pratica che mettono l’accento sulla ricerca meditata della consapevolezza e sul suo risultato attivo: il gesto, l’atto della pittura.
Una pittura “attiva”, che ha il suo mezzo originale nella liquidità dell’inchiostro e nella calligrafia, le cui tracce affiorano nei modi più diversi nella selezione delle opere e degli artisti in mostra al PAC. Dalla maniera in cui, per esempio, le opere pittoriche si producono con il contributo del caso e del quotidiano (Lee Kit); al rifiuto dei quadri a chiudersi nella staticità, restando invece immagini in movimento (Li Shurui); alla ripetizione ossessiva come forma suprema di cambiamento (Ding Yi); al suo rendersi istintiva, mimetica e spaziale (Zhang Enli). Tutto fa da controcanto a una pittura occidentale che è sempre stata più ieratica e iconografica.
Jing Shen vuole anche suggerire quanto l’arte e le avanguardie occidentali del secondo dopoguerra siano state influenzate da questa cultura artistica, dalla pittura a inchiostro e dalla calligrafia, e dalle filosofie a queste sottese: da Hartung a Pollock, a Cage, a Burri, a Boetti. E vuole pensare all’arte nel suo insieme come al risultato di uno scambio e di influenze continue attraverso il tempo e lo spazio, dove i canoni interpretativi non possono che essere erranti, adattabili e temporanei.

Previous post

고암 조각展 – “RELATIONAL COMMUNICATION / 관계와 소통” - GALLERY MOA - KOREA

Next post

TRECCANI 1925 - 2015 LA CULTURA DEGLI ITALIANI - PALAZZO MORANDO - MILANO

No Comment

Leave a reply

Il tuo indirizzo email non sarà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *